Brown rice syrup better than sugar

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Brown rice syrup is a natural sweetener rich in minerals, excellent to replace sugar. Because it is less caloric and ideal in gluten-free recipes

Brown rice syrup is a natural sweetener used in cooking to replace sugar. And honey in culinary preparations, excellent for sweetening drinks, herbal teas, and desserts. It is obtained from the splitting of rice starch into simple sugars thanks to the addition of purified enzymes. There is no confusion between syrup and rice malt though: rice malt is obtained by adding sprouted barley to cooked cereal. The enzymes present in the sprout split the starch of the cereal into simpler sugars. In a similar process to what happens during digestion. So the malts are obtained from the union of barley with another cereal, while the syrups are obtained from a single cereal. In this specific case, the rice syrup, therefore, does not contain barley gluten-free and can also be consumed by celiacs.

Properties of rice syrupBrown rice syrup

This syrup has the advantage of not containing gluten. But it also hides other tricks up its sleeve: the glycemic index of this sweetener is comparable to that of sugar but compared to the latter, it is excellent in low-calorie diets because it contains fewer calories, about 240 calories per 100 grams (a third less than sugar) and even less fructose: in fact, the predominant sugar in rice syrup is maltose (composed of two glucose molecules). This food is sugar with the most minerals. It contains calcium, potassium, iron, and sodium. However, it should not be forgotten that it is still a sugar, therefore its intake must be moderate, and consequently, it is not sufficient to take the necessary minerals, in fact, as for all added sugars it must be limited to no more than 20 grams per day.

Where to buy it

Brown rice syrup can be found in organic shops or fair trade centers in glass jars. If you find it difficult to find it then you can opt for online order.

Curiosity

Rice syrup is actually extracted from brown rice, even if it retains most of the minerals, due to the splitting of the starch it loses fibers and proteins, moreover, the process used is very similar to that used to produce beer.

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